Special: Massasoit’s Peace Pact with the Pilgrims (11/26/2022)

Massasoit was the leader of the Wampanoag Confederacy when English settlers landed at Plymouth Rock in 1620.  He and his people kept the Pilgrims from starving in the early years of their settlement, attended the first Thanksgiving and forged a peace treaty with the English that lasted 40 years until his death.  Peace Talks Radio talks with American Indian scholars Darius Coombs and Bob Charlesbois who’ll fill in the details of this Native American leader’s attempt to make peace for his people and with the new strangers.  Also, Native American film director Chris Eyre on his portrayal of Massasoit for the 2009 PBS television series We Shall Remain.

Airs Saturday, November 26, 2022 at 9am.


Distributed by PRX. Produced by Good Radio Shows, Inc., a non-profit media organization whose mission is to create broadcast programs, printed materials and web content that inform, inspire and improve the human condition. Topic areas include: peace-making and conflict resolution, social justice, media literacy, education, the environment, the performing arts, literature, the humanities, current events and public affairs. Producer Paul Ingles is the founder and president of Good Radio Shows, Inc.

Broad Stripes, Bright Stars, and White Lies: America’s First Flag (6/25/2022)

In honor of Flag Day and the Fourth of July, the Smithsonian unveils the often misunderstood stories behind two of our nation’s most famous flags: the Betsy Ross flag, and the Star Spangled Banner.

Betsy Ross sewed the first American flag. At least, that’s what we were taught in school. But when historians go searching…there’s no proof to be found. So how did this story get started? In this special hour-long episode of the Smithsonian’s Sidedoor podcast,  we unravel the Revolutionary history behind this vexillogic tall tale. In the process, we learn that the real Betsy Ross was anything but the mild mannered seamstress we think we know. And we discover the work of the women behind another of America’s most famous flags: the Star Spangled Banner.

Airs Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 9am.

Sidedoor is a production of the Smithsonian Institution. More than 155 million treasures fill the Smithsonian’s vaults, but where public view ends, Sidedoor begins. With the help of biologists, artists, historians, archaeologists, zookeepers, and astrophysicists, host Lizzie Peabody sneaks listeners through Smithsonian’s side door to search for stories that can’t be found anywhere else.

 

Spotlight on the Confusion of Covering Mental Health Care (4/30/2022)

Saturday, April 30 at 9am

Spotlight on the Confusion of Covering Mental Health Care will help make sense of what kind of mental health care is supposed to be covered, and how health plans, regulators and you can make it easier to get the therapy you need.

This critical, dynamic hour-long program will provide personal and policy examples of how individual efforts, state action, insurance practices and policy can improve on existing federal and state parity laws so more people can get much-needed care that is too-often denied. Reported stories will explain what mental health parity is supposed to look like for various conditions and what’s being done to improve enforcement. Personal stories will reveal the impact of being denied substance use and eating disorder care and the complications people and their families are forced to navigate during a crisis.

Featured guests include:

  • Ali Khawar – Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor for Employee Benefits Security Administration
  • Pamela Greenberg – President and CEO at the Association for Behavioral Health and Wellness
  • Patrick Kennedy – former U.S. Representative (D-RI), founder of The Kennedy Forum

About Call to Mind

Call to Mind’s Spotlight programs explore an emerging area of understanding in mental health. Produced quarterly, Spotlight programs aim to illustrate new knowledge and understanding to empower people to engage with in their personal and public well-being. All Call to Mind programs are produced with a focus on gender, racial and other equitable identity representation.

Host bio

Kimberly Adams, Marketplace host & correspondent

Kimberly Adams is a host/correspondent at Marketplace, America’s largest broadcast business program. She covers the intersection of politics and the economy from Washington, DC, where she also serves on the Board of Governors of the National Press Club. Before moving to DC, Kimberly was a Cairo-based freelance journalist reporting on the political, social, and economic upheaval in Egypt following the Arab Spring. Her work aired on multiple networks in the United States, Canada, the UK, Germany, Hong Kong, and elsewhere.

Kimberly identifies as a Black woman (she/her).

Special series: Kinship with the More-Than-Human World (April 2022)

In various cultures around the world, human identity cannot be separated from our nonhuman kin. The landscapes we call home — grasslands and forests, mountains and rocks, rivers and oceans — are shared by nonhuman beings who may be considered relatives. Age-old myths and modern science reinforce these kinship relationships. From forest ecology to the human microbiome, emerging research suggests that being human is a complicated journey made possible only by the good graces of our many companions.

In partnership with the Center for Humans and Nature and with support from the Kalliopeia Foundation, Wisconsin Public Radio’s To The Best Of Our Knowledge is exploring this theme of “kinship” in a special radio series. Leading scientists, philosophers and writers illuminate ways in which “personhood” transcends the human species and shows how kinship practices can deepen our care and respect for the more-than-human world.

Airs Saturday mornings at 9am during the month of April 2022.

Kinship—Part One: Eye-to-Eye Animal Encounters

Kinship—Part Two: Plants As Persons

Kinship—Part Three: When Mountains Are Gods

Kinship—Part Four: Shapeshifting

The So-called Mystery of Rapa Nui (Easter Island)

Outside/In from New Hampshire Public Radio asks, who moved the giant monolithic statues of Rapa Nui, a remote island in the South Pacific? And how did they do it? These questions have been at the center of much speculation and debate since Europeans first arrived there 300 years ago on Easter Sunday, 1722, and called it “Easter Island.” The most popular theory was that this remote civilization destroyed itself – cutting down all the trees to make contraptions for moving statues.

But according to the indigenous people of Rapa Nui, their ancestors didn’t need to cut down any trees to transport the statues. In fact, their oral history has always been clear about how the moai were transported.

What happens when your community becomes the subject of a global mystery? A parable of human failure and ecological collapse? What’s the true story? And who gets to tell it?

Aired Saturday, March 26, 2022 at 9am. Listen to it here:

Additional Credits

Reported, produced, and mixed by Felix Poon
Edited by Taylor Quimby
Executive Producer: Rebecca Lavoie
Additional Editing: Justine Paradis, Jessica Hunt, Rebecca Lavoie, and Erika Janik
Special thanks to Effie Kong, and Daniela Allee for her Spanish and Rapanui voiceovers.
Theme: Breakmaster Cylinder
Additional Music by Blue Dot Sessions

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